Leading Construction from the Ground Up

WHAT SETS A BUILDER APART WHEN IT COMES TO MANAGING LARGE-SCALE CONSTRUCTION TEAMS? 

When working with large groups of contractors and subcontractors, if details are allowed to slip through the cracks a project can easily get out of hand. Managing numerous people and companies, who all have their own goals and needs, can result in confusion and frustration.

Over the past four decades, United Builders Service has become a leader in metal stud framing and drywall installation in the Denver region.  Throughout this journey, we have worked with numerous subcontractors and contractors.  Our success has come from an unwavering focus on ensuring that each person we bring to a site is not only skilled in their job, but also has the track record to prove it. Through these interactions, we have learned how to work with, lead, and motivate large groups of diverse people to meet GC’s highest expectations for professionalism.

LOOK FOR COMPETENCY

The first sign of successful crew is the competency with which they complete their jobs. By examining a company’s past work, such as their framing and drywall contractor portfolio, you can assess the level of experience and skill that the team brings to the table.

Checking references from past projects can also be helpful, as issues may emerge such as extended delays on previous projects, problems with finishes or textures, or a lack of skilled laborers. Each of these must be considered before picking the right company for a project.

COMMUNICATION IS KEY TO A SUCCESSFUL BUILD

Once a team has been assembled, the success of a build then rests on communication between the site managers, contractors, and the leaders of the teams. Properly communicating each step of the way ensures that problems can be identified quickly, and that each part of the larger team understands exactly what they need to do.

If a team is failing to communicate it can have a negative impact on their work and is likely to slow down other parts of the project. In order to fix a lack of communication, a project manager can use techniques such as joint meetings, detailed reviews of project specs and deliverables, and procedures for daily or weekly updates. But it is always best to avoid problems before they occur, so focus on selecting contractors that have clear systems in place for internal and external communications.

INTEGRITY IN A CROWDED FIELD

Integrity is an essential part of working with a varied group of people. Being able to keep promises to your team, as well as upstream and downstream partners, ensures that contractors are happy, that jobs are completed on time and correctly, and that contractors, subcontractors and materials providers will want to work with the project manager, and leadership team again. In your selection process, be sure to look for a team that has established a strong track record for integrity through many years of service, a strong portfolio of completed projects and happy clients, and a demonstrated level of expertise in their field.